History Commons Groups

April 22, 2011

9 New Posts


9 new entries, one for Domestic Terrorism and 8 on the “birther” controversy in Domestic Propaganda.

And, repeating the contact info:

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April 20, 2011

New Posts in Domestic Propaganda

Filed under: Propaganda — Max @ 9:56 am
Tags: ,

8 new entries, all in Domestic Propaganda. We’re starting to trace the history of the “birther” controversy.

January 26, 2011

New Posts This Week


Second in a biweekly series of updates. Like last week, we’ve posted lots of new material on WikiLeaks, domestic terrorism, the Plame-Niger and the finances behind European football.

We’ve added half a dozen or so WikiLeaks entries in the Domestic Propaganda project, with one crossposted in Iraq under US Occupation.

Several new entries are now in the Iraq-Uranium subproject.

Lots of new entries are in the Domestic Terrorism project, including material on US militias, environmental and animal-rights activists, and early entries in the Branch Davidian subproject.

And we’ve done a fistful of entries on the finances behind European football (soccer for the Americans) in the Miscellaneous project. Still pondering over the best permanent home for these.

If you’re not writing for the History Commons, give it a spin, we’d love to have you. And we are always financially strapped, so anything you can donate will be very welcome.

January 23, 2011

This Weekend’s Postings


First in a new and hopefully daily (or at least biweekly) series. This weekend, we’ve posted a good bit of new material. Lots of material on WikiLeaks, domestic terrorism, and the finances behind European football.

Almost a dozen new WikiLeaks entries in the Domestic Propaganda project, with one crossposted in Iraq under US Occupation.

Two new entries in the Iraq-Uranium subproject.

Lots of new entries in the Domestic Terrorism project, including material on US militias, environmental and animal-rights activists, and early entries in the Branch Davidian subproject.

Finally, a fistful of entries on the finances behind European football (soccer for the Americans) in the Miscellaneous project. We’re still pondering over the best permanent home for these.

If you’re not writing for the History Commons, give it a spin, we’d love to have you. And we are always financially strapped, so anything you can donate will be very welcome.

June 18, 2009

Weekly Update


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Perhaps the most interesting thing this week is that an HC contributor found a document in the National Archives showing that, two days before 9/11, the military practiced responding to a simulated hijacking by suicide terrorists targeting New York. The document also mentioned a number of other previously-unknown hijacking-response exercises, and has been written up at the contributors’ blog.
Read more.

There are also several additional entries in the 9/11 Timeline, about the 9/11 Commission and the day of the attacks.
Read more.

The Domestic Propaganda Timeline focuses on the back-and-forth of Sonia Sotomayer’s nomination to the US Supreme Court, and Karl Rove instructs readers that the word “empathy” is actually code for “liberal activism.”
Read more.

The Economic Crisis Timeline marks the 30th bank failure in the US this year, which was Silverton Bank in Atlanta.
Read more.

Lastly, a contributor to the A. Q. Khan Timeline highlights possible Saudi funding for Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program.
Read more.

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